Your baby is fully dependent on you. You provide her with liquid gold that we all know is the best for her. But what if you offer both breasts and your baby is still crying? Sometimes we thought it’s our milk that isn’t enough that makes our baby cry endlessly–but sorry mommy,  it’s not always about your milk!  So please don’t doubt your super milk-production powers, it will just stress you out,  and we don’t want that.

Not all babies are the same, but all babies cry. When she cries, it’s her way of communicating her needs and asking a loving response from you. So how are you supposed to know exactly what your baby is trying to tell you? It can be tricky to interpret your child’s cries, especially at first. So to help you figure out the reason of her cries, here are the common reasons why and what you can try to soothe her:

Hunger

This is probably the first thing you think of when your baby cries. Learning to recognize the signs of hunger will help you start feeding your baby before the crying stage. Some hunger signs to watch for in newborns include fussing, lip smacking, rooting (a newborn reflex that makes babies turn their head toward your hand when you stroke their cheek), and putting their hands to their mouth.

Stomach problems from colic and gas

Tummy troubles associated with gas or colic can lead to lots of crying. The rather mysterious condition known as colic is usually described as inconsolable crying for at least three hours a day, at least three days a week, at least three weeks in a row.

If your baby often fusses and cries right after being fed, she may have some sort of tummy pain. Even if your baby isn’t colicky and has never been fussy after eating, an occasional bout of gas pain can make her miserable until it passes. If you suspect gas, try putting her on her back, grasping her feet, and moving her legs in a gentle bicycling motion.

Needs to burp

Burping isn’t mandatory. But if your baby cries after a feeding, a good burp may be all he needs. Babies swallow air when they breastfeed or suck from a bottle, and this may cause discomfort if the air isn’t released. Some babies are intensely bothered by having air in their tummy, while others don’t seem to burp or need to be burped much at all.

A dirty diaper

Some babies let you know right away when they need to be changed. Others can tolerate a dirty diaper for quite a while. Either way, this one is easy to check and simple to remedy.

Needs sleep

It seems like tired babies should simply be able to go to sleep, anytime, anywhere. But it’s harder for them than you might realize. Instead of nodding off easily, babies may fuss and cry – especially when they’re overtired.

Wants to be held

Babies need a lot of cuddling. They like to see their parents’ faces, hear their voices, and listen to their heartbeats, and can even detect their unique smell. Crying can be their way of asking to be held close.

You may wonder if you’ll spoil your baby by holding him so much, but during the first few months of life that isn’t possible. To give your arms some relief, try wearing your baby in a front carrier or sling.

Too cold or too hot

If your baby feels chilly, like when you remove her clothes to change a diaper or clean her bottom with a cold wipe, she may protest by crying.

Newborns like to be bundled up and kept warm – but not too warm. As a rule, they’re comfortable wearing one more layer than you need to be comfortable. Babies are less likely to complain about being too warm than about being too cold, and they won’t cry about it as vigorously.

Something painful and hard to notice

Babies can be troubled by something as hard to spot as a hair wrapped tightly around a tiny toe or finger, cutting off circulation. (Doctors call this painful situation a “hair tourniquet,” and it’s one of the first things they look for if a baby seems to be crying for no reason.)

Some babies are extra sensitive to things like scratchy clothing tags or fabric. And they can be very picky (understandably) about subtleties ranging

Teething pain

Teething can be painful as each new tooth pushes through tender young gums. Some babies suffer more than others, but all are likely to be fussy and tearful from teething at some point.

If your baby seems to be in pain and you’re not sure why, try feeling his gums with your finger. You may be surprised to discover the hard nub of an emerging baby tooth. (On average, the first tooth breaks through between 4 and 7 months, but it can happen earlier.)

Wants less stimulation

Babies learn from the stimulation of the world around them, but sometimes they have a hard time processing it all – the lights, the noise, being passed from hand to hand. Crying can be a baby’s way of saying, “I’ve had enough.”

Many newborns enjoy being swaddled. It seems to make them feel more secure when the world gets overwhelming. If your baby’s too old for swaddling or doesn’t like it, try retreating to a quiet spot and letting your baby vent for a while.

Wants more stimulation

A “demanding” baby may be outgoing and eager to see the world. And often the only way to stop the crying and fussing is to stay active. This can be exhausting for you!

Try wearing your baby facing out in a front carrier so he can see all the activity around him. Plan plenty of activities. Hang out with other parents with babies. Go on regular outings to kid-friendly places, such as your local playground, a children’s museum, or the zoo.

Not feeling well

If you’ve met your baby’s basic needs and comforted him and she’s still crying, she could be coming down with something. You may want to check her temperature to rule out a fever and be alert for other signs of illness.

The cry of a sick baby tends to be distinct from one caused by hunger or frustration. If your baby’s crying just doesn’t sound “right,” trust your instincts and call or see a doctor.

Mom is stressed

Babies are experts at picking up on stress. If mom is stressed, baby might be reacting to that. Try taking a deep breath, and letting go of whatever is stressing you. Listen to soothing music, relax, imbibe in something that soothes you. If all else fails, give yourself permission to eat that snack that you know you shouldn’t eat but that always makes you feel better. Or tell yourself that later that night you’re going to take a long warm bubble bath and have a soothing massage. Yoga breathing or deep breathing can help calm mom, and making low deep sounds such as “ohm” or humming can help soothe baby. If you’re really really having a hard time ask someone else to hold the baby, take a few minutes to breathe, and then try again.

What should I do if nothing seems to work?

It is normal for babies to cry, so try not to blame yourself if your baby simply won’t be soothed. Sometimes a baby who keeps crying won’t do herself any harm, but it’s likely to put you and your partner under strain. If she’s unhappy and resists every effort to calm her down, you may feel rejected and frustrated

  • But you are not the cause of her crying. Sometimes, simply accepting that you have a baby who cries a lot can help. If you’ve met your baby’s immediate needs and tried everything you can to calm her, it’s time to take care of yourself:
  • Put your baby in her cot and let her cry for a few minutes out of your range of hearing. Take deep breaths and let yourself relax for a moment or two.
  • If you and your baby are both upset and you’ve tried everything, call a friend or relative for support. Give yourself a break and let someone else take over for a while.
  • Find a local support group or parent-and-baby group. That way you can meet other new parents in the same situation and offer each other moral support. You can also get coping strategies before everything gets too much. Don’t let things build up, as it could make things harder for you and your baby.

Living with a baby who regularly cries inconsolably can be very stressful,  both to you and your little one. That’s why we have a gift for you and your family: OLEIA topical oil. It relaxes and soothes fast. It is 100% natural and safe for babies.

Massage your little one every once in a while. Doing this regularly may help your baby to cry and fuss less. It has a calming effect that your babies will love. And for you super mom who can also feel tired and stressed, just apply Oleia Topical oil on the affected part of your body and it will stop the pain, fast—and naturally. (Tip: Dads can also use this to relieve stress at work or in sports. You may also give each other a relaxing massage after a tiring day.) Truly, Oleia Topical oil is a gift for every member of the family.

Oleia Topical oil comes in relaxing Lavander,  calming Chamomile,  and refreshing Peppermint.

 

About The Author

Andrea is a full time home maker. When she is not busy taking care of her husband and kids, she goes out giving financial management talks. She is a proud breastfeeding mom for four years running and an avid Oleia Topical Oil user.

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